19 November 2016

Crushing the serpent's head

The depiction of Mary with the serpent’s head under her feet is taken from Genesis 3:15 in the Vulgate, the Latin translation of the Scriptures. In the New American Bible this verse reads: “I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; He will strike at your head, while you strike at his heel” (Genesis 3:15).

According to this translation it is not the woman, but “He” – that is, the woman’s offspring – who crushes the serpent’s head. This agrees with other Bible translations, including the new version of the the Vulgate on the Vatican’s website, and more importantly, with the original Hebrew text.

This passage is known as the protoevangelium, the first proclamation of the gospel, and it a great encouragement to God’s people.

The War

The serpent deceived Eve and our first parents fell in sin. Maybe the devil thought that he had permanently ruined God’s good creation and that he had sealed humanity’s doom.

God quickly intervened and declared war on him. The devil and his seed would be engaged in a conflict with the woman and her seed. The seed of the woman is Jesus, born of the virgin Mary, who came to earth to destroy the works of the devil.

The decisive battle was fought at Calvary. The devil bruised Christ’s heel. In that dark hour Christ was betrayed, oppressed and crucified. But the inflicted wound did not take long to heal. On the third day the Lord Jesus rose victoriously over sin, death and the devil.

In the same battle the devil received the mortal blow. He had one destructive weapon against us, namely his accusation before God that we are guilty and therefore we should perish with him. As long as humanity was burdened with guilt, all people were slaves of Satan. But by his sacrifice on the cross Christ made reparation for the sins of his people and obtained their freedom. Their enemy was disarmed and he cannot accuse them any longer. Christ has crushed the serpent’s head.

The Victory

God’s people will be buffeted for some time by their defeated enemy, but not for long: “The God of peace will soon crush Satan under your feet” (Romans 16:20). Christ’s triumph is their victory too! Satan will be cast into the lake of fire forever.

The first woman, Eve, listened to the serpent’s lie. God’s children do not. The Lord gives them a new heart so that they respond obediently to God’s Word, just as Mary did: “Behold, I am the servant of the Lord; let it be to me according to your word” (Luke 1:38).

Moreover, they understand that God had eternally planned their redemption through the suffering of his Son, “he was pierced for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities” (Isaiah 53:5). The serpent’s vicious attack on the woman’s seed resulted in their liberation.

Glory to God for this wonderful picture that the Scriptures portrays of Christ crushing the serpent’s head under his feet. Let us give thanks and praise God for the hope and victory we have in him.

(Gospel e-Letter - December 2016)

28 October 2016

Where do good people go?

A poster on Facebook read: “Good people don't go to heaven – forgiven sinners do.” There were many likes, shares and amen's to this remarkable and thought-provoking statement. The only problem is that it is false!

The people who shared it may have thought they were proclaiming the gospel of grace. But it is not the true gospel. It is another ‘gospel’. It is a horrible perversion that guarantees damnation to all who follow this demonic heresy.

Where, may I ask, should good people go? Why should God condemn them to hell? Surely not because they are good! That would make the Judge of the earth unjust!

Good and faithful

But that is not what we read in the Bible. The apostle who most forcefully preached justification to him “who does not work but believes in him who justifies the ungodly” (Romans 4:5), also declared that God gives eternal life “to those who by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honour and immortality” and again, he gives “glory and honor and peace for everyone who does good” (Romans 2:6-11). In a word, good people go to heaven.

The Judge himself, Jesus, tells us plainly that “those who have done good” will come out to the resurrection of life (John 5:28-29). The lazy and indifferent will go to eternal punishment, while “the righteous into eternal life” (Matthew 25:46). The poster says that good people do not go to heaven, but the Bible says that Lord himself will call them “good” and welcome them, “Well done, good and faithful servant ... Enter into the joy of your master” (Matthew 25:23).

Jesus calls sinners

But someone may object: does not the Bible say that Jesus did not come to call the righteous, but sinners? (Luke 5:32)

Yes, Jesus came and called sinners to himself. He continues to call sinners and freely grants them forgiveness and reconciliation with God. But that is not all. He calls sinners to repentance, to a change of mind, and hence, a change in attitude and behaviour. Jesus calls them to forsake sin. He calls them to deny themselves and follow him. To them who hear his call the Saviour grants forgiveness and leads them in the path of righteousness.

More than forgiveness

Let us never forget this biblical truth. God’s salvation is not only forgiveness. God also sanctifies the people he forgives. He gives sinners a new and obedient heart, freedom from the bondage of sin, and the Holy Spirit to change them into the image of Christ.

I do not nullify the work of Christ on the cross by pretending to merit salvation by my good works; nor do I not nullify the work of Christ by his Spirit who transforms sinners to saints. The potter takes a piece of clay in his hands and transforms it into a glorious masterpiece.

Forgiven sinners go to heaven; good people go to heaven. They are the same people; they are saved – forgiven and transformed – by the grace of God.

(Gospel e-letter - November 2016)

22 September 2016

Can salvation be lost?


Can a genuine Christian lose his or her salvation? Can a child of God end up in hell?

It all depends on God because he is the Saviour. From beginning to end, salvation is his work. Therefore we should rather ask if God can lose any of his chosen ones whom he knew and loved from eternity past.

Scripture teaches that the Father’s purpose will be accomplished. “Those whom he predestined he also called, and those whom he called he also justified, and those whom he justified he also glorified” (Rom 8:30). God determined beforehand the glorious destiny of his people even before they existed.

Moreover, the Son of God came to earth to fulfil God’s eternal plan. He said: “this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose nothing of all that he has given me, but raise it up on the last day” (John 6:39). The Father gave all believers to Christ; he came to the world to redeem and give them a glorious and immortal body.

The Holy Spirit too works on behalf of all believers. They are told not to “grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemption” (Eph 4:30). Sadly sometimes they do grieve him by their sins, yet they are not cast away. The Spirit still protects them and brings them to the day of redemption, to their final glorious resurrection.

What shall we say about God’s salvation? Can the Father’s purposes be thwarted and brought to nothing? Can he predestine some to glory and yet end up damned? Can the Son of God fail in his mission? Can Jesus lose some even though the Father wills that he loses nothing? Can the Holy Spirit fail to seal believers to their final redemption?

But what about the believer’s free will? Can a Christian choose to be unsaved? No! His will has been freed from the bondage of sin, and he is freely attracted to the love of the Father. Hence he lives righteously, and even when he goes astray, he is disciplined and restored. The Father saves his children from their own pride and foolishness. The Father will glorify them whom he had predestined; the Son will not lose even one of his own, and the Spirit will bring them safely home.

A Christian will never lose his salvation. The triune God keeps him safe! I believe the Scriptures. I trust in God. I sincerely hope that you believe too.

(Gospel e-Letter - October 2016)

1 September 2016

Once saved, always saved?

It is not my intention to discuss the question of ‘eternal security’ here. I am compelled to write about a much more important subject. One may have ‘assurance’ of salvation, and yet he may not be saved at all! There is such a thing as false assurance.

I am concerned about this issue for two reasons. First, I am worried about many evangelical Christians who are spiritually misguided. They presume to be saved and to be eternally secure but as a matter of fact they are still lost and in danger of the fire of hell. I am also very much concerned about the false impression that Catholics and other have of the evangelical message. The popular ‘gospel’ proclaimed in many evangelical circles is a caricature of the real one. I do not fault Catholics who oppose and reject it.

A young man, let’s call him Ben, attends an evangelistic meeting. He hears the message and responds to the altar call. He makes a decision for Christ and prays the sinner’s prayer. His heart is full of joy. Ben is told that since has placed his faith in Christ, he is now saved and that he has eternal life. He can be sure that, come what may, he will spend eternity in heaven. ‘Once saved, always saved,’ they tell him.

Or is it possible that Ben has been deceived?

Was the message that he heard the true gospel or some perversion of it (2 Cor 11:4)? Is the altar call and walking the aisle a biblical practice or merely a human tradition? Is salvation based on a human decision; does not the Bible explicitly teach that a person is not born again by the human will (John 1:13)? Can someone recite a prayer with his mouth while his heart is still unrepentant (Isa 29:13)? Is joy the certain proof of a genuine spiritual experience; are not human emotions excited by many other things (Luke 8:13)? Can his profession of faith be false (Matt 7:21)? What if he does not continue in the faith (Col 1:23)? What if his faith remains fruitless and devoid of good works (James 2:14)? What if he continues to love the world (1 John 2:15)? What if he continues to walk in darkness of sin, immorality and greed (I John 1:6)? What if he has no love for the brethren (I John 3:14)? And what if he refuses to walk in obedience to the commandments of the Lord (1 John 2:4)?

Ben’s assurance is a lie. He has no scriptural reason to consider himself saved; indeed he has many scriptural reasons to believe that he is not.

Dear friend, if you can identify yourself with Ben, please reconsider your spiritual condition before the Lord God. You are not ‘always saved’ – actually you were never saved. Once you were lost and in great danger; now you are worse off because you are deceived, thinking that all is well, when in fact you are still in your sins. Please do not dismiss this solemn warning. It would be a hopeless tragedy to hear Christ’s condemnation, “I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.”

(Gospel e-Letter - September 2016)

1 August 2016

The hour of our death

We don’t know when, but a time will come when we have to depart from this world. At that hour nothing but one thing is essential.

It will not matter how much wealth and possessions we had accumulated. We will leave all behind us. We must let go of everything - even our loved ones. With tears and sorrow we have to say our final goodbyes. Not even our health will matter anymore. Our bodies will crumble and fall.

Only one thing matters: our soul! For in the momentous hour our spirit will leave to meet our Maker. That hours marks the beginning of eternal bliss or everlasting woe.

Our eternal destiny depends solely on our relationship to God during this life. We must make a fundamental choice. Either we trust in God completely or we do not trust him at all. We cannot entrust our souls to anyone else. He alone is worthy of our wholehearted trust, confidence, obedience and adoration. He alone sent his beloved Son to reconcile us to himself, to forgive us all our sins, and to bring us to himself in glory.

The righteous live by faith in God. There is no other way to live. There righteous die by faith. They trust the Lord to take them home. At the hour of his death, the first Christian martyr, Stephen, called upon the name of his Saviour, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” He is now in heaven enjoying the sweet fellowship with his faithful Redeemer in whom he had trusted.

Do you entrust your soul to Christ now? Whose name will you call in that final hour?

(Gospel e-Letter - August 2016)